Best Mouse Bait Options – 10 Most Successful

To be successful at catching mice, one of the most important things you must know is which mouse bait to use in your traps.

Without that knowledge, your chances of catching mice are low!

I’ve lost count of the number of mice I have caught over the years, but what I haven’t lost is the list of bait I use to catch these rodents time and time again.

In this post, we will take a look at the best bait for mice, so you can be successful in getting rid of mice around your home.

Mouse Trap Bait Options

Best Mouse Bait – Top 10 Food Items To Use For Mouse Bait

10 Mouse Trap Bait Options infographic

1. Peanut Butter

mouse trap bait, peanut butter on knife and toast

There is ‘good bait for mice,’ and then there is the best and most successful!

Peanut butter is the most successful.

It has worked repeatedly for me when I set up mouse traps, and it is my go-to product when I need to catch them. It is one of the most common and well-known mice baits to use and is easily available at nearly all stores.

Obviously, you need to ensure that nobody with a peanut allergy will be in contact with the traps before choosing this bait!


2. Chocolate

chocolate bar, bitten. Mouse trap bait

Mice have a sweet tooth, which certainly makes chocolate a good bait for mouse traps.

Add a piece of chocolate to the trap before setting it. I have found in the past that heating chocolate up and pouring a little bit of it on the trap works better than just adding a chunk of chocolate.

By adding a chunk of chocolate, you risk the bait being stolen, falling off, or being taken by the mouse if it is clever enough.

Melting chocolate before applying means it is stuck to the trap and extra force is needed to remove it, which results in more successful trapping.


3. Cat/Dog Food

Cat eating food from dish

Mice trap bait doesn’t have to be the good stuff that we humans like to eat, too (peanut butter, chocolate). Wet cat or dog food is an excellent choice for mouse bait. Not only do you have the chunks to attract them, but they will also want to lick the mouse trap clean afterward!

Again, you do not have to add a great deal of food to the trap. Add a small amount.


4. Nuts

hazelnuts, cobnuts, mouse trap bait

When considering what to use on mouse traps, you have to consider what mice eat in the wild, right?

Mice eat nuts in the wild, so why not use them as bait for a mouse trap?

Before setting the mouse trap, break the nut into pieces and squash it onto the trap. This will ensure the nut will not roll off before the mouse gets to it!


5. Hazelnut Spread

Jar of hazelnut spread

Hazelnut spread is nutty and chocolaty! A fierce combination of scents that will attract mice straight to the trap.

Like the rest of the options on this page, you only need to add a small amount to the trap to attract mice.

Ensure that you go for the full-fat version, do not be tempted to go for a reduced-calorie hazelnut spread.

Like peanut butter, please do not use it if anyone in the house has a nut allergy.


6. Caramel

Caramel chocolate egg, half egg with caramel leaking out

Caramel on its own works perfectly well, but it works even better if it is inside some chocolate.

Grab yourself some caramel and place it on the mouse trap!

Not only is it delightful and attractive to mice, but it also sticks to the trap and increases the chances of a successful capture.


7. Soft Cheese

Soft cheese in a container

I must admit, I have not had much success in the past with hard cheese, but I have had a lot of success with soft cheese.

It does not have to be the smelliest cheese either; any soft cheese is perfect for the job. The soft cheese will stick to the trap, increasing the chances of a successful capture!

The stickier the mouse bait, the more force is needed to take it off the trap. Even traps that are not very sensitive will trigger, catching, or trapping the mouse.


8. Meat

Carved beef joint

Mice eat meat too, and I have had success in the past when I have used cuts of hot dogs and other meat.

Bacon is a great option, and although you can use cooked and uncooked, my preference is to place cooked bacon onto the mouse trap because it reduces the risk of spreading bacteria.

Chicken, turkey, ham, and beef are great meat options for trapping mice.


9. Mouse Food (Seeds)

2 mice eating seeds

Take a trip to the local pet shop and purchase some mouse food. When you have mice as pets, this is the food they live on.

Mouse food is mostly made up of seeds, such as pumpkin seeds, but it can also contain maize, wheat, and oats. All of these ingredients will tempt mice into the trap.


10. Gumdrops/Gummy Bears

red, green gumpdrops

Gumdrops are sticky, sugary, and can even be covered in chocolate. Perfect for catching mice!


My Mouse Trap Bait Is Being Stolen, Help!

Take these steps to remove the chances of your trap being stolen:

  • Apply the correct amount of bait
  • Apply the bait so it ‘sticks’ to the trap, making it difficult to remove
  • Lay your traps correctly (against walls and in confined runs)

Rules For Baiting Your Mouse Traps

When setting your traps, you must remember to set the traps correctly and safely.

  • Apply enough bait, but not too much
  • Apply the bait before setting the trap
  • Wear gloves
  • Apply bait so that it sticks to the bait bucket

There are lots of different types of traps you can use:

  • Electronic mouse traps
  • Humane
  • Snap traps
  • Multi catch

Baiting them will be slightly different for each type.


Are Mice Smart Enough to Avoid Traps?

The simple answer is no. A mouse is not smart enough to know that it is walking into a trap. If that were the case, then no traps would work.

Whilst the above is true; there is a caveat to that statement. Mice have a tremendous sense of smell, and they may actively avoid a trap if it smells too much of a human. After all, mice are scared of humans.

I always wear gloves when setting traps for mice and other rodents because I do not want the scent to be passed from my hands when I set mouse traps or a bait station.

If you have set the snap trap (or whatever you are using) and worn gloves, then it will work well the catch a mouse.


Conclusion

Above are 10 of the best mouse bait options to ensure you get a successful capture in your bid to have a mouse-free house! Every single option on this page effectively catches mice, whether you are using snap traps or humane traps.

Mouse bait is one of the key drivers in how successful you are going to be. Setting a trap without one of these bait options may lead to frustration and you giving up on your DIY rodent control quest!

For the best results, use one of the options on this page.

Good luck

27 thoughts on “Best Mouse Bait Options – 10 Most Successful”

  1. Hello. My name is Dan, well now I suspect my wife may call me “Big Dan” since I, yes I!, have caught a mouse in a mousetrap that I baited myself, thanks to the help of this web page.

    Now I just need to call an exterminator to have them come and pick up the dead mouse and the used mousetrap that’s still sitting on the floor in my basement. 😉

    Reply
    • Hi Big Dan!

      Congratulations on catching a mouse. I am glad you found this page helpful!

      Getting rid of the dead mouse isn’t a nice job, but it is still easier than getting rid of a live one 🙂

      Reply

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